Posts Tagged: Google Analytics


23
Feb 10

Tracking bit.ly with Google Analytics

I came across a very cool tool that the folks at bit.ly set up to help with track and organize your bit.ly campaigns.

Bit.ly is a popular link shortening service that allows you to reduce the size of long URLs for posting into Twitter, Facebook and other social media.  The great thing is the bit.ly has built in some fantastic basic metrics so you can see how many people clicked on your link, how many reposted it somewhere, and even segment what country your clicks are coming from.

The good folks at bit.ly took it a step further by setting up a nifty tool that integrates your bit.ly campaigns into Google Analytics by helping you tag them by GA parameters such as utm_source, utm_medium, utm_content and more.

The bit.ly GA tool is basically a spreadsheet that creates a long “manually tagged”  URL, that pulls in your bit.ly API to automatically generate a bit.ly link for you.

You open the tool (in google docs), enter your campaign info such as:

  • Source (referrer: twitter, facebook, email, etc)
  • Medium (banner, cpc, email, etc.)
  • Content (description)
  • Campaign (spring09, etc.)

And boom!  You have an automatically generated bit.ly URL that you can use.

Yes, you could do the same thing without bit.ly (just manually tag your URLs), but in the fast moving world of social media, bit.ly makes it possible to see your metrics in real time.  Then, with a properly tagged link you set up with the bit.ly GA tool, you can dive deeper in Google Analytics later.  For most people Google Analytics does not let you see real-time data. Bit.ly makes it possible.

To set up your own Google Analytics Optimized Bit.ly. Campaign check out the tool at http://bit.ly/ga-campaign-tool.  Simply change the username and API to your own bit.ly user and API and you are good to go.


23
Feb 10

Google Analytics Qualified

Just a short post to say I just took and passed the Google Analytics qualification exam. Feels good add it to my quiver, but of course it is just the beginning.   I also continue to take the Web Analytics Master Certification course with Avinash and John Marshall over at Market Motive.

Google Analytics Qualification CertificateThe Google Analytics Individual Qualification is a proof of proficiency in Google Analytics that is available to any individual who has passed the Google Analytics IQ test.

The Google Analytics test was heavy on the tactical side, with lots of questions about specifics of setting up segments, goals, filters and profiles.  Other questions focused on cookies, regex, campaign tracking and Adwords integration.

The Market Motive Master Certification course on the other hand, is a balance of both the strategic and tactical. Avinash talks about the “10/90 rule”.  He says companies should spend 10% of their budget on a tool, and 90% on smart people to pull actionable insights from the tool.  Hence, we are spending a good balance of the time discussing  not so much of the “what” (clickstream data), but how to get to the “why” (understanding and inferring customer intent from the data so that we can drive action and site optimization).

Some of the topics so far:

  • Measuring outcomes — KPIs should focus on ROI  (if there is was just one topic – this would be it)
  • Segmentation — getting to actionable insight means slicing and dicing your customers to understand how each group thinks and behaves
  • Internal Search — adding another layer of your understanding by peeking into your customer’s mind by measuring what they search for on your site
  • Surveying — creating effective surveys that give insight to your customer wants and needs

More to come… this week we are diving into experimentation and testing:  A/B and multivariate…


25
Jan 10

Excel Plugin for Google Analytics

I have been using Google Analtyics and it is great.  One of the challenges with it is easily importing data into Excel for further analysis and reporting.  One way to do this is with a nifty plugin from the folks at http://excellentanalytics.com/

Excellent Analytics functionality:

  • Build queries with all dimensions and metrics available in Google Analytics
  • Apply filters to create advanced queries
  • All queries are stored in the spreadsheet

Benefits of reporting and analyzing Google Analytics data in Microsoft Excel:

  • Get one less tool to keep track of
  • Use a familiar interface
  • Combine data from multiple data sources
  • Use Excel formulas, charts, and pivot tables
  • Define and calculate customized KPIs
  • Build dashboards just the way you like them
  • Share workbooks with other Excel users

Imported data is stored in the spreadsheet so you can sort, manipulate, and distribute data to anyone using Microsoft Excel.